STATE HOUSE – The first meeting of a special legislative task force to review and provide recommendations on policies pertaining to the Rhode Island Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights is scheduled Wednesday.

The meeting is scheduled Wednesday, July 22, at 1:30 p.m. in the Senate Lounge. The meeting will include the appointment of a chairperson and an overview by the National Council of State Legislatures on state statutes pertaining to LEOBOR and recent trends regarding community-police relations. No public testimony will be taken at this meeting. The State House remains closed to the public as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The hearing will be televised on Capitol Television, which can be seen on Cox on Channels 15 and 61, in high definition on Cox Channel 1061, on Full Channel on Channel 15 and on Channel 34 by Verizon subscribers. It will also be live-streamed at www.rilegislature.gov/CapTV. Media members wishing to arrange for in-person coverage are asked to contact Greg Paré at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The task force, created by legislation sponsored by Sen. Harold M. Metts and approved by the Senate June 18, is to comprehensively study and provide recommendations on the Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights (LEOBOR), to ensure accountability and protection against misconduct. Adopted in Rhode Island in 1976, the LEOBOR protects officers accused of misconduct, preventing them from being immediately fired or put on leave without pay, and allowing their continued employment to be decided by a panel of other police officers. The law has been widely criticized by many who believe it prevents justice from being served when officers are abusive.

“Public safety officers are to protect public safety, and there should not be ways to prevent those who pervert justice from being held accountable,” said Senator Metts (D-Dist. 6, Providence), who will serve on the task force. “The black, brown and southeast Asian communities have long called for genuine reform of this law to protect our safety. While it shouldn’t take widely distributed videos of police brutality and murder, as well as worldwide protests, to finally bring about change, I’m hopeful that our call is finally too great to ignore.”

The 13-member task force includes:

·         Senator Metts

·         Sen. Cynthia A. Coyne (D-Dist. 32, Barrington, Bristol, East Providence)

·         Sen. Gordon E. Rogers (R-Dist. 21, Foster, Coventry, Scituate, West Greenwich)

·         Attorney General Peter F. Neronha

·         State Police Superintendent Col. James M. Manni

·         Providence Police Chief Col. Hugh T. Clements Jr.

·         Rhode Island Human Rights Commission Executive Director Michael Évora

·         NAACP Providence Branch President James Vincent

·         Anthony Capezza Jr., representing the Rhode Island AFL-CIO

·         Latino Policy Institute Director Marcela Betancur

·         Providence External Review Board Executive Director Jose F. Batista

·         Rev. Howard M. Jenkins Jr.

·         Rev. Chontell N. Washington

 

The resolution creating the task force calls for it to study protection of the rights of residents, conduct and accountability responsibilities, police relations with racial and ethnic minority communities, police management, disciplinary procedures, enhanced training for cultural competency and mental health, and diversity in all law enforcement agencies. The task force is to report to the Senate by Feb. 9, 2021.

The Health and Human Services secretary is meeting with the president of Taiwan at the highest-level meeting between Washington and the island nation in decades. The meeting between Alex Azar and Tsai Ing-wen has strained relations with China even further. Taiwan is being celebrated as a success story in the fight against the coronavirus, with fewer than 500 cases and only seven deaths in its population of 23 million people.        Donald Trump says his new postmaster general is trying to make the service self-sustaining. The President told reporters Sunday the postal service has been losing massive amounts of money for decades. Louis DeJoy has eliminated overtime for carriers and sent a memo telling them to leave mail behind at distribution centers if they will slow down the delivery process.        It appears the White House contacted the governor of South Dakota to find out the process for adding a fifth president to Mount Rushmore. Governor Kristi Noem said the first time she met the President he told her it was his dream to have his face join George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Teddy Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln. The National Park Service says there is no stable space to add another face, so it will remain at four.       The BBC's Director-general is apologizing after a report used a racial slur on the air. The British organization originally stood behind their choice to use the slur in a report on a racially motivated attack last month. Now, Tony Hall says he now sees how the word caused distress and said the BBC would look into their guidelines on offensive language across their platforms.       Rain and the Nationals' grounds crew struggling to move the tarp suspended the Orioles 5-2 lead over Washington in the sixth inning until Friday. With rain moving in, the grounds crew could not cover the infield in time before rain soaked the infield. The game will pick up with one out in top of the sixth inning in Baltimore later this week.