WOONSOCKET, R.I. – The Museum of Work & Culture, a division of the Rhode Island Historical Society, will reopen to the public beginning Wednesday, August 5.

The Museum, which has been closed since March 15, will be opened on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 10am-4pm for visitors who have purchased tickets in advance. Tickets are available at rihs.org/buy-tickets

“We are so happy to be able to welcome the community back,” said MoWC Director Anne Conway. “The health of our guests and the Museum team is always our top priority and we have been working hard to ensure that we can provide a safe and engaging visitor experience. The Museum is a great place to spend a few hours discovering an important chapter of our state’s history while beating the summer heat.”

The Museum is following all state guidance on cleaning, mask-wearing, social distancing, group size limits, and all other mandated health and safety protocols as outlined in the State of Rhode Island Phase III Guidelines. Exhibits feature signage related to capacity, motion sensors are being used to trigger audio features, and personal styluses are being provided to guests to trigger touch components. More information about their policies and procedures can be found by visiting rihs.org.

About the Museum of Work & Culture

The interactive and educational Museum of Work & Culture shares the stories of the men, women, and children who came to find a better life in Rhode Island’s mill towns in the late 19th- and 20th centuries. It recently received a Rhode Island Monthly Best of Rhode Island Award for its SensAbilities Saturdays all-ability program.

About the Rhode Island Historical Society

Founded in 1822, the RIHS, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is the fourth-oldest historical society in the United States and is Rhode Island’s largest and oldest historical organization. In Providence, the RIHS owns and operates the John Brown House Museum, a designated National Historic Landmark, built in 1788; the Aldrich House, built in 1822 and used for administration and public programs; and the Mary Elizabeth Robinson Research Center, where archival, book and image collections are housed. In Woonsocket, the RIHS manages the Museum of Work and Culture, a community museum examining the industrial history of northern Rhode Island and of the workers and settlers, especially French-Canadians, who made it one of the state’s most distinctive areas. 

President Trump says he's not sure if he believes the reported last wish of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Ginsburg's granddaughter said that before her death, the justice dictated a statement that said -- "My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed." Trump was interviewed on Fox and Friends and suggested that the note was actually penned by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer or Adam Schiff, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee.        Tropical Storm Beta is moving up the Texas coast. Beta made landfall Monday night brining heavy rains. The storm is forecast to make a hard right and head up the coast today. By Wednesday evening, it will move into southwest Louisiana, which is still recovering from Hurricane Laura.        The NFL is making it clear that not wearing a mask will cost you. The league on Monday fined Seattle Seahawks coach Pete Carroll, San Francisco 49ers coach Kyle Shanahan and Denver Broncos coach Vic Fangio 100-thousand dollars each for not wearing masks during their Sunday games. All three teams were also fined separately.        The Ohio State University College of Medicine and Wexner Medical Center are set to begin researching the impact of COVID-19 on first responders. University officials confirmed yesterday their upcoming five-year study would be funded by a ten-million-dollar grant from the National Cancer Institute. The research will follow two-thousand participants over the five years.       The man who killed Beatles icon John Lennon says he did it for glory. Mark David Chapman was denied parole for the 11th time last month for the 1980 murder, when he shot Lennon in front of his New York City apartment. Newly released transcripts from the parole hearing reveal Chapman said he was angry at Lennon and jealous of the way he was living. He also said he had a list of three other celebrity targets if he wasn't able to kill Lennon.        Today is National Voter Registration Day and Twitter is taking it seriously. Every person on Twitter will get a prompt on their timeline to register to vote, or to confirm their registration through TurboVote. That's an online tool from the nonpartisan nonprofit Democracy Works.