Sen. Lombardi to introduce bill to give family caregivers access to residents in nursing homes during pandemic

 

STATE HOUSE — As COVID-19 continues to tragically separate nursing home residents from their families, one state senator, Frank S. Lombardi (D-Dist. 26, Cranston), plans to introduce legislation that would give family members access to their loved ones in nursing homes during emergencies such as the coronavirus pandemic.

The bill would mandate that long-term care facilities establish an Essential Family Caregiver program that would allow a resident to have an essential caregiver designated. The caregiver would be a person such as a family member, outside caregiver, friend, or volunteer who provided regular care and support to the resident prior to the pandemic; and that person would be given more access to the resident on a regular basis to ensure their emotional and physical needs are met.

“It’s a tragedy that nursing home residents — particularly those suffering from dementia — continue to be separated from their families,” said Senator Lombardi. “It’s frustrating and infuriating that the social and psychological well-being of these residents is in jeopardy because they are unable to communicate with those they love. They may be safe from coronavirus, but they’re inflicted with a debilitating loneliness.”

In the legislation Senator Lombardi plans to propose, a person may request to designate more than one essential caregiver based on their past involvement and needs. The bill would require the Department of Health to develop rules and regulations on designating an essential caregiver and the criteria to qualify. 

Seven states, Minnesota, Indiana, Ohio, New Jersey, Florida, South Dakota and Michigan, currently have a variation of such a designation that would allow visitation during COVID-19 restrictions.

 

There's an agreement on a bipartisan infrastructure deal. Ohio Republican Senator Rob Portman said they have worked out what he called the "major issues." Portman added the bill is paid for.       House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is being pressed about calling Republican leader Kevin McCarthy a "moron." During a news conference, Pelosi did not revisit the "moron" remark, but said McCarthy's comments about the renewed House mask mandate were "not wise." This came after Capitol physician Brian Monahan put the mandate in place Tuesday to fight back against the Delta variant.       Drugmaker Pfizer is recommending a third dose of its coronavirus vaccine. They say it can "strongly" boost protection against the Delta coronavirus variant. New data from the company suggests a third dose can give five-times the protection against the variant than just two shots.       State attorneys general want to revive their antitrust lawsuit against Facebook. A judge had dismissed the suit saying the actions took place more than five years ago, but now they're working to appeal its dismissal. New York's attorney general said Facebook must be held accountable while accusing the social media giant of "stifling competition, reducing innovation, and cutting privacy protections."       McDonald's sales are spiking thanks to the BTS meal and its new chicken sandwich. Named after the popular K-pop band, global sales at the fast food chain surged past Wall Street targets as consumers in nearly 50 countries gobbled up the BTS chicken nugget meal. McDonald's same-store sales jumped over 40-percent in the second quarter.       Despite recent rumors, Paris Hilton says she's not pregnant. On Tuesday's episode of her podcast This is Paris, she said she's not expecting a child with fiance Carter Reum. However, she did say she can't wait to have children in 2022 after she gets married.