Equality Caucus Endorses Co-Chair

David N. Cicilline for Assistant Speaker

 

Washington, D.C. – The Congressional LGBTQ+ Equality Caucus endorsed DPCC Chair David N. Cicilline (RI-01) in his campaign for Assistant Speaker today. For the next two years, the LGBTQ community and the Democratic Party need leaders who are focused on doing the hard work to bring members together and get things done for the American people. Time and again, Chairman Cicilline has shown that he has an incredible work ethic and the ability to deliver the results that are needed right now – and absolutely critical to maintaining a Democratic House majority.


Cicilline, the only openly LGBTQ member of House leadership, is the author of the Equality Act, which the House passed last year to extend federal protections against discrimination to the LGBTQ community.

The Caucus issued the following statement after endorsing Cicilline:

“The LGBTQ community is a vital and important part of the Democratic Party. For decades, LGBTQ people have given our time, our money, and our energy to this coalition. Two weeks ago, the LGBTQ community stepped up once again, helping to ensure that our nation is led by those who are committed to equality for all.”

“While we are excited that we will soon have a champion in the Oval Office once again, we are also mindful of the difficult work that lies ahead. It will take years to reverse the damage that Donald Trump’s policies have done to our community. This task will be made even more difficult with conservatives now holding a supermajority on the Supreme Court.”

“Representation matters. When Democrats vote next week in our caucus elections, it’s critical that our community not lose its voice at the leadership table. DPCC Chairman Cicilline is the first member of our community to serve in House leadership. As an LGBTQ man, he understands personally the damage that Donald Trump has done – especially to young LGBTQ Americans – through his words and deeds. We remain the only minority community that can still be discriminated against in 30 states. With the appointment of Amy Coney Barrett, our rights are at even greater risk.”

“For the past four years, Chairman Cicilline has worked relentlessly, listening to the cares and concerns of every member of our caucus and then working to build consensus on an agenda that delivers results For The People. We are proud to endorse his candidacy for Assistant Speaker.”

 

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