Cumberland Residents Invited to

Plan Rhode Island PBS Documentary

Our Town: Cumberland

 

Informational Meeting Held Wednesday, March 31

 

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND (February 15, 2021) – Do you have a great story about Cumberland’s people, places, or events? Rhode Island PBS wants to hear your ideas at a virtual town meeting on Wednesday, March 31 at 6 p.m.

 

As part of the station's ongoing effort to provide local communities with a storytelling platform, Rhode Island PBS invites residents and friends to learn about the upcoming production of Our Town: Cumberland. The informational meeting will be held online, and interested residents are asked to register in advance.

 

Our Town is a Rhode Island PBS documentary project in which neighbors become filmmakers to capture the unique experiences, untold stories, and hidden gems of their own community. Part community-builder, part culture catalog, part fundraiser, and part “day-in-the-life” scrapbook, each edition of Our Town shares the local legends, historical events, and neighborly anecdotes of a Rhode Island town and its villages. 

 

For Our Town: Cumberland, the twelfth installment in the series, town residents are invited to contribute their own miniature films to the documentary compilation. At the virtual town meeting, participants will learn more about the production, and then discuss their own topics and ideas. The project's director and producer will outline the timetable and submission deadlines. Local business owners are also invited to attend for promotion and sponsorship opportunities. Throughout the presentation, participants can ask questions in real time chat with Rhode Island PBS staff. 

 

Although Cumberland residents are especially urged to participate, town residency is not a requirement - one must only have a great town story to tell. Rhode Island PBS welcomes the entire community to come and learn how easily their story can be captured and shared.

 

There are no restrictions on age or experience, and there is no cost or compensation to participate. For those with a story in mind but no camera to capture it, Rhode Island PBS has equipment to lend by appointment.

 

Participants are welcome to shoot footage for their stories any time before the submission deadline. Rhode Island PBS offers technical advice throughout, and then edits the stories together to create a one-hour film for broadcast. 

 

For more information about the Our Town: Cumberland project, visit ripbs.org/our-town. Participants may call project director Jodi Mesolella at 401-222-3636, extension 209, project producer Nicole Muri at extension 225, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

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