Rep. Felix calls for rent relief clinics to get word out to BIPOC communities about help that’s available

 

STATE HOUSE — Rep. Leonela “Leo” Felix (D-Dist. 61, Pawtucket) joined with Dr. Luis Daniel Muñoz, Direct Action for Rights and Equality, and the George Wiley Center today in calling for clinics to get the word out about relief options that are available for Rhode Islanders who are having difficulty paying rent.

“COVID-19 has exacerbated the housing crisis in our state, and both landlords and tenants are facing extremely difficult choices,” said Representative Felix during a press conference at the State House. “The financial help to pay rent or mortgages is there, but too many people can’t access it.”

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Aug. 26 to invalidate the federal eviction moratorium, eliminating vital eviction protections that have kept millions of households stably housed.

“I acknowledge the hard work that Rhode Island Housing is doing to ensure people get economic relief through Rent Relief RI, and I know it hasn’t been easy,” said Representative Felix. “But regardless of that effort, communities who are most in need of eviction relief funds — BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) communities — are being left behind. Community organizations like the George Wiley Center, Direct Action for Rights and Equality, Center for Justice, and others are trying to fill that gap, but they can’t do it alone.”

Representative Felix proposed the establishment of clinics, modeled after the equity-focused BIPOC Vaccination Clinics, which would help individuals and families not only to get information about rent relief options, but to sit down with a trained volunteer to apply for the relief right away.

“We need to meet people where they are,” said Representative Felix. “We need to acknowledge that cultural, language and digital divides really do exist in Rhode Island; and it is up to us to address them.”

     

 

-30-

 

 

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki doesn't seem phased when it comes to President Biden's job approval rating. Speaking to reporters on Friday, Jen Psaki [[ SAH-kee ]] said the President will remain focused on doing his job, leading the American people and pushing for "fundamental changes that will make people's lives better." A new Gallup poll has Biden's approval rating at 42-percent.       Arizona's attorney general is seeking to stop President Biden's vaccine mandate from being implemented. Republican Mark Brnovich [[ burn-uh-vich ]] is asking for a temporary restraining order, along with a preliminary injunction, that stops it from being enacted across the country. The order requires businesses with over 100 employees to get vaccinated.        Numerous Chicago workers are taking the city to court. A lawsuit was filed Thursday in a federal court by over 130 city workers claiming the local state and vaccine mandates are unconstitutional. An executive order by Governor JB Pritzker requires health care workers and certain state workers to be vaccinated.        The Dow Jones Industrial Average is finishing the week at an all-time high. It climbed 73 points to log its first record close since August 16th. At the end of the day, the Dow finished at 35-677.       The family of Gabby Petito is breaking their silence following the positive identification of Brian Laundrie's remains. Petito family lawyer Rick Stafford said the family is not conducting interviews at this time while they grieve the loss of their beautiful daughter. The attorney for Laundrie's family told ABC News they're also not speaking publicly at this time.       Kellogg's is being taken to court over one of its popular breakfast items. NBC10 reports the company is accused of false advertising regarding its Frosted Strawberry Pop-Tarts. The suit states the labeling is misleading, saying the pastry's filling has more "strawberries than it does."