Our 2023 Annual Report

 

 
 

We're excited to share our 2023 Annual Report and hope that you find it to be a useful reflection on a year of transition, future planning, and impressive growth and impact.

 

As you’ll see throughout its pages, the team at the Foundation ably balanced effective grantmaking, inspiring philanthropy, and listening and learning from the Rhode Islanders we serve during a transformative time.

 

Last year, thanks to the generosity of our donors, we were pleased to award a record $89 million in grants to approximately 2,500 nonprofit organizations; two-thirds of which were donor-directed, and one-third of which was directed through the Foundation’s community investments programs. On page 8, you will find an illustration of how those grant dollars were allocated by subject matter to meet need throughout the state, and you will see just how much alignment there is between the grants that our team is responsible for and those that our donors direct. Together, we are making an incredible impact.

 

Our team continues to focus on careful endowment stewardship, and we have weathered market fluctuations quite well. At the end of 2023, total assets stood at approximately $1.4 billion, and our total fund investment return for the year was 14.2 percent. In addition, we raised $46 million in gifts.

 

As we continue to assess the Foundation’s fundraising, grantmaking, and programmatic efforts, we have also focused on gathering input from the community to inform our future focus. We have gathered perspective through a series of research efforts, by crisscrossing the state to visit grantees and donors, hosting sector-specific convenings and open community conversations.

 

Later this year, we will share more about all we’ve learned and about how we plan to intentionally put that into practice in our grantmaking, beyond-grantmaking, and development efforts to catalyze generosity and action across our state.

 

We are deeply grateful to the generous Rhode Islanders who partner with us to turn their philanthropy into a powerful force for good, and to the dedicated nonprofits who serve our community.

 

We invite you to access the full 2023 Rhode Island Foundation Annual Report, including our financial performance, activities, the inspiring stories of some of our many incredible donors, and more. Click here to launch or download.

 

All the best,

David & Al

 

David N. Cicilline, President and CEO

 

G. Alan Kurose, MD, MBA, FACP, Chairman of the Board

 
 
 

Interested in serving on a non-profit board?

 

 

We are seeking passionate Rhode Islanders who are looking for ways to serve our community and make a lasting difference by helping shape the state's critical nonprofit sector through board service.

 

Join us for Board Bootcamp on Saturday, June 8, 2024, for a full-day learning opportunity designed to equip participants with the awareness, skills, and capabilities to serve on a nonprofit board. Agenda topics include an introduction to the nonprofit sector, governance and financials, as well as case studies and a panel conversation with current board members. Board Bootcamp is offered free of charge, and a light breakfast, lunch and refreshments will be provided.

 

Our target audience for this program is anyone under age 35, or who identifies as a person of color, or as a person with moderate income, and has never served on a nonprofit board before. If you are interested in attending, you can learn more and apply here by May 27.

 

Please contact Jill Pfitzenmayer, Vice President of Capacity Building, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you have any questions or need further information.

 

 

Upcoming Deadlines

 

·     May 20: June Rockwell Levy Foundation Health or Housing Grants

·     May 27: Board Bootcamp

·     May 27: Providence Fire Fighters Local 799 Scholarship Fund

·     June 7: Grants from the Program for Animal Welfare

·     June 18: 1829 Legacy Fund Grants

·     Ongoing: Basic Human Needs Grants

·     Ongoing: Responsive Grants

·     Ongoing: Strategic Initiative Grants

 
 

 

One of life's greatest achievements is the ability to leave a lasting legacy.



We can help.



The White House isn't saying whether or not the President would commute his son Hunter Biden's sentence. Press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre declined to say whether President Biden would consider doing so, although she pointed to his previous comments that he would not pardon his son. Hunter was convicted Tuesday of three federal felonies for unlawfully purchasing a gun while addicted to drugs.       The Federal Reserve is not changing interest rates. Officials predict they will only cut borrowing costs once before the year ends. Fed chairman Jerome Powell told reporters today inflation has eased substantially but is still too high. He said the central bank is committed to bringing inflation down to its two-percent goal. The benchmark rate is in a range of five-and-a-quarter to five-and-a-half-percent.       Severe weather in Florida is delaying flights at airports across the U.S. As of early this afternoon, there have been just over three-thousand flights delayed within, into or out of the United States according to FlightAware. In Florida, the flight tracking site says there has been more than 300 delays and over 160 cancellations at Miami International Airport as of 2 p.m. local time. Passengers are urged to check with their airline before heading to the airport.       Eight men with possible ties to ISIS are arrested after crossing the southern border into the United States. ICE agents arrested the men over the weekend in New York, Los Angeles and Philadelphia. Sources said on Tuesday that the eight suspects had been on the FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force radar. It turns out none of the men have criminal records. They have not yet been charged with a terror connection or a plot.       Survivors of the Sandy Hook school shooting are set to graduate high school. Over 300 students will be graduating from Newtown High School in Connecticut today, and 60 of those students will be survivors of the mass shooting that killed 26 people at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012. On Thursday, another mass shooting will be remembered when demolition begins on Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, where 17 people were killed in 2018.       Sony Pictures is entering the movie theater business. The studio announced Wednesday that it has bought Alamo Drafthouse Cinema. The Texas-based theater chain that serves food and drinks and famously has a strict no-talking and no-texting policy has more than 30 locations in the U.S. Film distributors had been prohibited from owning exhibition companies between 1948 and 2020. Sony is the first major Hollywood studio to enter the theater market since the restriction was rescinded.