Editor's Note:  Readers are reminded that the following reports were written by people who work for the General Assembly.

 

Feb. 1, 2019

 

           

 

This week at the

General Assembly

 

STATE HOUSE — Here are the highlights from news and events that took place in the General Assembly this week. For more information on any of these items visit http://www.rilegislature.gov/pressrelease

 

 

§  Senate OKs Conley bill to protect furloughed workers during shutdowns
The Senate has passed legislation (2019-S 0065aa) introduced by Sen. William J. Conley Jr. (D-Dist. 18, East Providence, Pawtucket) that enables city and town councils to grant relief from the payment of taxes during periods where federal or state government cease governmental operations for employees of the state or federal government. The measure moves to the House of Representatives, where similar legislation (2019-H 5191) has been introduced by Rep. Carlos E. Tobon (D-Dist. 58, Pawtucket).
Click here to see news release.

 

§  Rep. Lima reintroduces legislation to ban the renting or leasing of ‘forever pets'

Deputy Speaker Charlene M. Lima (D-Dist. 14, Cranston, Providence) has reintroduced legislation (2019-H 5246) to prohibit any business or individual in Rhode Island from renting, leasing, or in any other way offering a live animal for sale as a “forever pet” other than by a full outright sale.  A “forever pet” is defined as any dog or cat purchased from a business or individual which purchase does not vest permanent ownership in the buyer.

Click here to see news release.

 

§  Rep. Amore reintroduces bill to allow 17-year-olds to vote in primary elections

Rep. Gregg Amore (D-Dist. 65, East Providence) has reintroduced legislation (2019-H 5139) that would allow 17-year-olds to vote in primary elections as long as the individual will be 18 years old by the date of the general or special election. Sen. Gayle L. Goldin (D-Dist. 3, Providence) is introducing the bill in the Senate.

Click here to see news release.

 

§  Rep. Shanley legislation would create office of inspector general
Rep. Evan P. Shanley (D-Dist. 24, Warwick) has introduced legislation that would create the office of inspector general. The bill (2019-H 5236) would establish the office as an independent administrative agency charged with the responsibility to investigate, detect, and prevent fraud, waste, abuse and mismanagement in the expenditure of public funds.
Click here to see news release.

 

§  Rep. McLaughlin bill would authorize $20 million to capital plan funds
Rep. James N. McLaughlin (D-Dist. 57, Cumberland, Central Falls) has introduced legislation that would authorize $20 million to the Rhode Island Capital Plan Funds, which allows certain funds to be allocated to agencies for the purpose of completing preliminary planning studies for proposed projects. The bill (2019-H 5148) would make an appropriation for transportation projects.
Click here to see news release.

 

§  Sen. Raptakis to reintroduce bill tying minimum wage increases to CPI

Sen. Leonidas P. Raptakis (D-Dist. 33, Coventry, West Greenwich, East Greenwich) will be reintroducing legislation that ties any future increase in the hourly minimum wage to the Consumer Price Index of the Northeast Region. Senator Raptakis introduced the same bill (2018-S 2246) last session.

Click here to see news release.

 

§  Sen. Lawson, Sen. Archambault bills would aid furloughed workers

Sen. Valarie J. Lawson (D-Dist. 14, East Providence) has introduced legislation (2019-S 0175) that would allow federal employees who are working during a government shutdown to receive unemployment benefits while they are working but not being paid.  Sen. Stephen R. Archambault (D-Dist. 22, Smithfield, North Providence, Johnston) has submitted legislation (2019-S 0192) that would establish a new program to assist federal employees who have been affected by a shutdown by making available state-backed loans not to exceed $5,000.

Click here to see news release.

 

§  Rep. Corvese files bill to create animal abuse registry
Rep. Arthur Corvese (D-Dist. 55, North Providence) has introduced legislation (2019-H 5113) to create a statewide animal abuser registry aimed at preventing those with a history of mistreating animals from obtaining other animals. The registry would be available online for anyone transferring a pet, and pet sellers and shelters would be required to check all those to whom they provide pets.
Click here to see news release.

§  Sen. Miller bill aims to expand support after overdose, mental health ER visits
The Senate Health and Human Services Committee held a hearing on legislation (2019-S 0139) sponsored by its chairman, Sen. Joshua Miller (D-Dist. 28, Cranston, Providence) to expand the Alexander C. Perry and Brandon Goldner Act on hospital discharge planning to allow hospitals to contact patients’ emergency contact and recovery coach in certain situations, in accordance with federal HIPAA guidance. The bill is meant to help ensure that those hospitalized for drug overdoses and mental health emergencies have personal support when they are discharged.
Click here to see news release.

§  Study commission on effects of wind turbines on marine life forms
Rep. Justin K. Price (R-Dist. 39, Richmond, Hopkinton, Exeter) was elected chairman at the first meeting of a legislative commission that will study the effects of wind turbines on all marine wildlife.
Click here to see news release.

 

 

 

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For an electronic version of this and all press releases published by the Legislative Press and Public Information Bureau, please visit our Web site at www.rilegislature.gov/pressrelease.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Easy Rider star Peter Fonda is dead. The son of Hollywood legend Henry Fonda and brother of Jane Fonda died this morning at his Los Angeles home. Fonda co-wrote the classic counter-cultural film and produced it. He also earned a Best Actor nomination for his performance in 1997's Ulee's Gold.       A computer glitch that shut down the systems of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection at the nation's airports appears to be over. It did, however, cause long delays for passengers arriving on international flights. The system was down for two hours. Airports are reporting that everything is slowly getting back to normal.       President Trump is claiming a Michigan Congresswoman "obnoxiously" turned down an offer from Israel to visit with her grandmother. Trump accused Representative Rashida Tlaib [[ tal-EEB ]] of grandstanding. Tlaib said she would not visit her grandmother because of the oppressive conditions Israel put on her if she were to travel there.       It probably won't stop all the conspiracy theories, but the New York City medical examiner is ruling Jeffrey Epstein's death a suicide. He released the autopsy of the financier who was accused of sex crimes involving minors. Epstein was found dead in his jail cell last weekend.       For the third straight week stocks are finishing lower than they were at the start of the week. The wild week ended on a good note, with the Dow up 307 points. Overall, stocks closed about two-and-a-half percent below where they were when the markets opened on Monday.       The University of Vermont can claim to be number one in at least one category: Smoking pot. The Princeton Review placed the school at the top of its Reefer Madness list. About 140-thousand students at nearly 400 schools were surveyed to determine which school's students smoke the most marijuana.